Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and achene mucilage have independent functions in seedling growth of a desert shrub.

TitleArbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and achene mucilage have independent functions in seedling growth of a desert shrub.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
JournalJournal of plant physiology
Volume232
Pagination1-11
ISSN0176-1617
Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis can play a role in improving seedling establishment in deserts, and it has been suggested that achene mucilage facilitates seedling establishment in sandy deserts and that mucilage biodegradation products may improve seedling growth. We aimed to determine if AM symbiosis interacts with achene mucilage in regulating seedling growth in sand dunes. Up to 20 A M fungal taxa colonized Artemisia sphaerocephala roots in the field, and mycorrhizal frequency and colonization intensity exhibited seasonal dynamics. In the greenhouse, total biomass of AM fungal-colonized plants decreased, whereas the root/shoot ratio increased. AM symbiosis resulted in increased concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll and decreased concentrations of salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Achene mucilage had a weaker effect on biomass and on nutrient, chlorophyll, and phytohormone concentration than did AM symbiosis. We suggest that AM symbiosis and achene mucilage act independently in enhancing seedling establishment in sandy deserts.

URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0176-1617(18)30556-X
DOI10.1016/j.jplph.2018.11.010
Short TitleJ Plant Physiol
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