Undergraduate Courses

 

The Department of Biology offers a variety of courses in many sub-disciplines of Biology and at levels from introduction for non-majors to specialized graduate courses. To see the complete list of courses offered in Biology, see the University Bulletin.

To view Biology courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalog in you myUK account. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "BIO" in the Course Prefix box or select BIO from the drop-down menu. There may also be Biology courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

Spring 2020 Courses

BIO 102 : Human Ecology

Scott Gleeson

A study of the interrelationships of man, populations, space, energy, food, mineral resources and other life on earth. Not for life science majors.

BIO 103 : Basic Ideas of Biology

Emily Croteau & William Burke

Introductory biology. Discussion topics are those relevant to both plants and animals-- cell structure and function, molecules important to living things, metabolism, heredity, environment. Not for life science majors.

BIO 111 : General Biology Lab

Claire O'Quin

Laboratory studies in the structure and function of cells, plants, and animals; ecology; heredity; and evolution.

BIO 148 : Introductory Biology I

TBD

BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

BIO 152 : Principles of Biology II

Melody Danley & Seth Jones & Claire O'Quin

The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

BIO 155 : Lab for Introductory Biology I

Madhusudan Srinivasan

This course is designed to provide a broad introduction into the data, results, and information associated with biological research, and into some of the analytical approaches used to test biological hypotheses. Communication of these aspects of biological research is crucial, and much of this lab course will be focused on the development of effective writing skills for the delivery of this information.

BIO 199 : Res Experience in Biology

Participation in biological research under the direction of a faculty mentor in Biology or a related field. A research contract signed by the student and faculty mentor must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Biology. Offered pass/fail only.

BIO 208 : Principles of Microbiology

Erin Richard

The course introduces fundamental microbiological principles and techniques. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between humans and microorganisms, especially bacteria and viruses, the use of antimicrobial agents, microbial antibiotic resistance, and the structural, functional, and evolutionary relationships among microorganisms.

BIO 209 : Intro Microbiology Lab

Erin Richard

Laboratory exercises in general microbiology. Laboratory, four hours per week

BIO 302 : Introduction to Neuroscience

Elizabeth Debski

This introductory course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding, at the physiological, cellular, and molecular levels, of how the nervous system functions to create behavior. It will also introduce students to the consequences of abnormal system functioning brought about by either disease or injury. Prereq: BIO 152 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

BIO 303 : Introduction to Evolution

James Krupa

This course covers topics in evolution, concentrating on the Darwinian theories of evolution including descent with modification, natural selection, and sexual selection. Topics will include: patterns of evolution, the genetic source of variation, measuring evolution, adaptation, speciation, human evolution, "evo-devo", and evolutionary medicine. Taught on campus (lecture, three hours; recitation, three hours) or online. Prereq: BIO 148, BIO 152 and BIO 155 or equivalent.

BIO 304 : Principles of Genetics

Brian Rymond & Peter Mirabito

A study of the physical and chemical aspects of the genetic material and their relationship to the expression and inheritance of the phenotype. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week.

BIO 305 : Introduction to Neuroscience Techniques

Seth Jones

This introductory lecture/laboratory course will provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge, as well as hands-on experience in basic behavioral, anatomical, and physiological techniques used by laboratory scientists in the investigation of the nervous system. Upon completion, students will be prepared for independent research experiences in working neuroscience laboratories.

BIO 308 : General Microbiology

Karla Lightfield

Fundamental concepts of microbiology. The nutrition, physiology, genetics, molecular biology of microorganisms, and their roles in nature and in infection and immunity will be studied.

BIO 309 : Microbiology Laboratory

Karla Lightfield

This course includes laboratory exercises that are designed to illustrate processes central to microbiology and to familiarize students with basic skills required for working with microorganisms in a safe environment. Students will become familiar with isolating, culturing, and identifying microorganisms, and with molecular techniques used to study and manipulate microbes.

BIO 315 : Intro to Cell Biology

Edmund Rucker

The structure and function of cells will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on the ultrastructure of cell organelles in plants and animals as a framework for understanding the compartmentalized nature of cell activity. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours/weekly.

BIO 325 : Ecology

Nicholas McLetchie & Jeremy Van Cleve

This course introduces the scientific study of relationship between organisms and their environment. The course is structured around levels of organization?from physiological ecology to individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, landscapes, regions, and the biosphere. Students will be expected to develop a solid knowledge base and understanding of key concepts and issues in contemporary ecology; to become familiar with how ecological understanding is attained by researchers; and to see how ecological knowledge and methods can be used to address important societal problems. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, an average of three hours per week.

BIO 350 : Animal Physiology

Robin Cooper & Jeffrey Osborn

An introduction to the basic principles of animal physiology. An elementary discussion of the major vertebrate organ systems including nutrition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction, peripheral and central nervous system, and endocrine function emphasizing homeostasis. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

BIO 394 : Research in Neuroscience

An independent research project in an area of neuroscience under the direction of a faculty mentor. A research contract signed by the student and the faculty research mentor must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Neuroscience). May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits, but a maximum of only 6 credits may be used to satisfy the requirements of the minor or major in Neuroscience. Prereq: BIO 152 and BIO 302 or PSY 312

BIO 395 : Research in Biology

An independent research project in an area of biology under the direction of a faculty mentor. The research may be conducted in the Department of Biology or in other biological units on campus. A research contract signed by the student and the faculty research mentor must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Biology. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits, but a maximum of only 6 credits may be used the satisfy the requirements of a BS or BA in Biology.

BIO 397 : Research in Microbiology 

An independent research project in an area of microbiology under the direction of a faculty mentor. The research may be conducted in the Department of Biology or in other microbiological units on campus. A research contract signed by the student and the faculty research mentor must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Microbiology.

BIO 398 : Research and Writing in Biology

Section 001 - Jennifer Osterhage : In this course, students will learn how to read, discuss, and synthesize primary scientific literature.  Students will utilize this knowledge to write a review article that synthesizes scientific findings on a topic of their interest.  Course fulfills the written communication requirement of the Biology GCCR.

Section 002 - Catherine Linnen : BIO 303 and BIO 304 are highly recommended for this section. This is a course-based research experience in which students will conduct hands-on research in the field of evolutionary genetics. The research goal will be to uncover the genetic basis of color differences between wild populations of plant-feeding insects. This course counts as an upper-level biology elective and meets the written requirement for the GCCR. If you have any questions please contact Dr. Catherine Linnen (catherine.linnen@uky.edu).

All Other Sections : An independent laboratory research project in an area of biology under the direction of a faculty mentor. The research may be conducted in the Department of Biology or in other biological units on campus. A research contract signed by the student and the faculty research mentor must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Biology. As part of the course, students will complete one or more formal written assignments that total at least 4500 words, with a significant portion of this assignment or assignments revised at least once. Completion of at least one of the Biology core courses (Cell Biology, Evolution, Genetics, Physiology, Ecology) is strongly recommended. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits, but a maximum of only 6 credits of independent research (BIO 394, 395, 397, or 398) may be used to satisfy the requirements of a BS or BA in Biology. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

BIO 402 : Practical Microscopy 

Jakub Famulski & Douglas Harrison

The objective of this course is to provide an operational understanding of the use of contemporary microscopes and the principles underlying biological imaging methods through a combination of lectures and hands- on laboratory experiences. Students will learn to use stereo and compound microscopes to image specimens using bright field, fluorescence, and enhanced contrast techniques. Students will also learn about the application of advanced microscopy methods to biological samples.

BIO 405 : Human Genetics

Ann Morris

This course will survey selected topics relevant to the understanding of the diversity and complexity of human genetics and genetic diseases, and will explore some of the contemporary methodologies used to identify genes underlying human genetic diseases. This course will also cover modern methods for genome analysis since the human genome sequence forms the foundation of current human genetics in research and medicine. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

BIO 410 : Vertebrate Endocrinology

Jessica Santollo

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of vertebrate endocrinology. Course topics will include the various classes of hormones, sources and synthesis of hormones, receptors and target tissues, mechanisms of action and regulation, and methods used in endocrinology and behavioral endocrinology. Details of classical endocrine systems will be explored. The last third of the course will focus on neuroendocrinology and how hormones influence the development and activation of behavior in humans and animal models.

BIO 425 : Biology Seminar

This seminar develops effective analysis, presentation, and discussion skills required of Biology majors by exploring various life science topics of interest to faculty and students. Satisfies seminar requirements for Biology majors and can be repeated for a maximum of two credits under a different subtitle. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

425-001 : Epigenics - Brian Rymond

425-002 : Plant-Animal Interactions - Carol Baskin

425-003 : Medicinal Plants - Carol Baskin

425-004 : Circadian Rhythms and Disease - Julie Pendergast

425-005 : Evolution and Medicine - Scott Gleeson

425-006 : David Weisrock

425-007 : Metabolic Pathways in Cancer and Aging - Chintan Kikani

425-008 : From Animal Venom to Zebrafish Eyes: How to Present Scientific Results - Oliver Voecking

425-009 : Marine Biology - Rebecca Williams

425-010 : Biochemistry of Alzheimer's Disease: The Search for a Cure - Jennifer Rodriguez-Rivera

425-011 : How is Climate Change Impacting your Favorite Species? - Danielle Herrig

BIO 426 : Neuroscience Seminar

This seminar course develops effective analysis, presentation and discussion skills required of science majors by exploring one neuroscience topic in detail.

426-001 : Astrocytes in Heath and Disease - Adam Bachstetter

426-002 : Neuroscience and the Law - Lance Johnson

426-003 : Astroglia, Neuroplasticity, and Drug Use - Pavel Ortinski

BIO 429 : Developmental Biology

Ashley Seifert

An introduction to the principles of developmental biology, particularly of animals, including genetic and environmental control of development at the molecular, cellular, and physiological levels.

BIO 445 : The Biology of Sex

Vincent Cassone

What is sex? Who has sex? What is sex for? This course is about the biological aspects of sex and gender, two of the most powerful forces in nature. We will explore the early evolution of sexual exchange of DNA and the emergence of genders. We will also discover the mechanisms by which gender is assigned across a vast array of different organisms and the amazing variability of sexual activity, ranging from duplicitous orchids to the rapacious passions of giant squid. Ultimately, we will explore the biological aspects of human sexuality in the context of its evolutionary origins and compare them to our closest relatives, the great apes. Readings in journal articles and a book will be complemented by short videos and discussions. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

BIO 447 : Animal Senses

Eve Schneider

Advanced study on how animals use sensory abilities to communicate, navigate, and detect prey, predators and mates. Focus will be on extreme and unusual sensory systems such as echolocation, electroreception, and magnetoreception, as well as vision, smell, touch, and hearing.

BIO 507 : Biology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms

Bruce O'Hara & Marilyn Duncan

This course provides an introduction to the fields of sleep and circadian rhythms including the underlying neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and the molecular and genetic underpinnings of sleep and circadian behaviors. The medical and societal relevance of these areas will also be emphasized. Considerable time will be spent reading and analyzing the primary literature in these fields, including student presentations of selected articles.

BIO 508 : Evolution

R C Sargent

Mechanisms of evolutionary change, with a brief summary of historical evolution, especially of the Metazoa.

BIO 520 : Bioinformatics

Jeremiah Smith

An introduction to computer analysis of macromolecular structure information. This course describes how to access, process, and interpret structural information regarding biological macromolecules as a guide to experiments in biology.

BIO 535 : Comparative Neurobiology and Behavior

Elizabeth Debski

The course consists of an introduction to neurophysiology and study of the neural basis of sensory processing and motor patterns. A comparative analysis of the neurobiological basis of behavioral responses will be made, utilizing a broad range of vertebrates and invertebrates.

BIO 559 : Ornithology

David Westneat

A study of the life histories, habits, identification, structure, adaptations, and physiology of birds. Special emphasis upon migrations, songs, nests and economic importance of our native birds. Lecture, field excursions, laboratory studies.

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