chemistry

Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame 2014

The College of Arts and Sciences inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame Oct. 10, 2014, with a ceremony at the Singletary Center for the Arts, bringing the current totals to 38 alumni and 13 emeritus faculty A&S Hall of Fame members.

2014 Alumni Inductees:

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

Robert Straus Lipman

Jill M. Rappis

George H. Scherr

2014 Emeriti Faculty Inductees:

George C. Herring

Keith B. MacAdam

View their Hall of Fame videos here: as.uky.edu/celebrates-new-hall-fame-members

New Beginnings: Chemistry Alumni Board

In 2013, a group of Chemistry Department faculty, students and alumni met to discuss reviving the department's newsletter, and an outgrowth of that effort to re-establish communications among current and future alumni was the Chemistry Alumni Board (CAB) which held its organizational meeting on Saturday, October 11, 2014.

Chemistry's John Anthony Named ACS Editor's Choice

A paper by John Anthony, professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry and faculty member of the Center for Applied Energy Research, has been recognized as the American Chemical Society's Editors' Choice.

A&S Hall of Fame 2014 - Dr. George H. Scherr

George H. Scherr is a bacteriologist, researcher and inventor, currently residing in Highland Park, Ill. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Queen’s College in 1941 – majoring in Biology with a minor in Chemistry – and studied chemistry at Princeton University before pursuing graduate study at the University of Kentucky. Scherr graduated from UK with a master’s degree in 1949 and a doctorate in 1951 in microbiology, focusing on bacteriology and cytogenetics.

Before receiving his graduate degrees, Scherr worked as a bacteriologist and researcher for the New York City Department of Health, the U.S. Civil Service Commission and the Biological Warfare Service. Following the completion of his doctorate, he served as an assistant professor of microbiology at the Creighton University School of Medicine and as an associate professor of bacteriology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Much of Scherr’s research has been dedicated to developing methods for stopping life-threatening infections.Through experiments with silver nitrate and sodium alginate, Scherr was able to create the royal silver alginate bandage, a wound dressing that keeps lesions sterile and prevents bacteria from multiplying. He gave the rights to his discovery to three companies – one in the US, one in Ireland and one in India – allowing this important infection-fighting tool to reach virtually all corners of the globe.

 

 

On The Road Again

Add It Up: A Q&A with Chemistry's Mark Meier

The new College of Arts & Sciences Research Computing cluster shares the basic design elements of a modern supercomputer, though at a smaller scale and lower cost. Multiple systems are linked together within a high bandwidth, low latency framework, allowing researchers to run demanding applications across hundreds of processors simultaneously.

UK Awarded $1.9 Million to Improve Retention of STEM Majors

Howard Hughes Medical Institute funds five-year project to promote student achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, in collaboration with BCTC

Naff Symposium 2014: Donald E. Ingber, "From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering"

 

 

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Donald E. Ingber Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Abstract: The newly emerging field of Biologically Inspired Engineering centers on understanding the fundamental principles that Nature uses to build and control living systems, and on applying this knowledge to engineer biologically inspired materials and devices for medicine, industry and the environment. A central challenge in this field is to understand of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade devices that exhibit or selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work that has begun to reveal these design principles that guide self-assembly of living 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. Key to this process is that the molecular frameworks of our cells, tissues and organs are stabilized using a tension-dependent architectural system, known as ‘tensegrity’, and these tensed molecular scaffolds combine mechanical load-bearing functions with solid-phase biochemical processing activities. I will describe how this structural perspective has led to new insights into the molecular basis of cellular mechanotransduction – the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry, gene expression and thereby influence cell fate decisions during tissue and organ development. In addition, I will present how these scientific advances have been facilitated by development of new micro- and nano-technologies, including engineering of novel human organ-on-a-chip microdevices that also have great potential value as replacements for animal testing in drug development and discovery research. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization, and how scientific discovery and technology development can be facilitated by equally melding fundamental science and applied engineering, are critical for anyone who wants to fully harness the power of biology.

 

 

Naff Symposium 2014: Hao Yan, "Designer Architectures for Programmable Self-Assembly"

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Hao Yan, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University

Abstract: The central task of nanotechnology is to control motions and organize matter with nanometer precision. To achieve this, scientists have investigated a large variety of materials including inorganic materials, organic molecules, and biological polymers as well as different methods that can be sorted into so-called “bottom-up” and “top-down” approaches. Among all of the remarkable achievements made, the success of DNA self-assembly in building programmable nanopatterns has attracted broad attention. In this talk I will present our efforts in using DNA as an information-coding polymer to program and construct DNA nano-architectures with complex geometrical features. Use of designer DNA architectures as molecular sensor, actuator and scaffolds will also be discussed.

Chemistry Undergraduate Poster Competition

Chemistry Undergraduate Poster Competition © Dana Rogers Photography - University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

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