research

Suburban Ecology and Invasive Species Research Experience at UK

Through a National Science Foundation program called Research Experiences for Undergraduates, 10 students from colleges across the country spent 10 weeks studying suburban ecology and invasive species at or nearby UK's Ecological Research Facility.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

 

 

Bishop to Lead Lecture in Research Ethics Lecture Series

The University of Kentucky Department of Philosophy and the UK Program for Bioethics will present the latest component in the Research Ethics Lecture Series Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Biology Grant Will Focus on Fish, Possible Key to Human Retinal Regeneration

Biology Professor Ann Morris' lab contains approximately 200 individual fish tanks, but only one type of fish.

Biology Grant Will Focus on Fish, Possible Key to Human Retinal Regeneration

 

 

Biology Professor Ann Morris' lab contains approximately 200 individual fish tanks, but only one type of fish. Having recently secured a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Morris will continue investigating zebrafish and the insight they offer in regard to solutions for human retinal degeneration. The NIH grant, titled, “The role of insm1 in vertebrate photoreceptor differentiation,” will be funded over five years and focuses on zebrafish to better understand genetic pathways that control the development of the retina. "Mammals cannot regenerate photoreceptors, because the retina is part of the central nervous system, and like other neurons in the brain, when you damage them you can't replace them," Morris said. "So that means when people get genetic diseases where the neurons, particularly the photoreceptors, start to die or to degenerate, there's no way of replacing those cells, so eventually they go blind. While that's true for mammals, it's not true for fish. Fish can regenerate photoreceptors." Morris' study focuses on both the development of the retina and photoreceptor regeneration in fish, as she hopes to gain insight that could eventually be applied to the development of cell-based therapies for human retinal regeneration.

Video courtesy of University of Kentucky Public Relations. uknow.uky.edu/multimedia/video

 

 

UK's Brandon Kulengowski Named Astronaut Scholar

The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF) has selected University of Kentucky student Brandon Kulengowski, of Lagrange, Ky., as one of this year's 28 recipients of the prestigious $10,000 scholarship.

American Female Professor Came Across the Ocean to “Water” the Desert Plants in Xinjiang

Biology Professor Carol Baskin recently received the Tiashan Award from the Xinjiang government for her contributions to the study of the ecology of desert plant seed.

Undergraduate Research at UK with Zaheen Rabbani

Zaheen Rabbani graduated from the University of Kentucky in May 2012 with dual degrees in biology and psychology. Zaheen credits his undergraduate research experience with developing critical thinking skills and prepping him to apply to medical school this fall.

"I probably learned more doing undergraduate research than I would have in a textbook. I’ve learned how processes work. It’s a different mindset. It allows you to think critically and that will definitely help in my future career. I’m going to apply to medical school in the fall. I hope to do research there as well.

"I’ve always been interested in research. That was actually one of my main reasons why I chose this university is because of its research focus," Zaheen says.

He started working in Physiology Chair Michael Reid's lab as part of a Bio 395 course, which gives undergrads credit hours for conducting research. "Patients who undergo a lot of chemotherapy report losses in muscle function. So my research focused on what treatment options are available, and the main goal was to prevent muscle atrophy.

"I think that most people are terrified at the thought of reaching out to faculty members and saying, 'Hey, I want to do research. What can I do to contribute to your lab?' You’d be surprised how many faculty members will welcome you with open arms and cause they’re always looking for somebody to take under their wing and mentor."

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Taylor Lloyd

University of Kentucky senior Taylor Lloyd got involved in research as a freshman, and she says it shaped her career path. In February 2012, Taylor was honored on the floor of Rupp Arena as a recipient of two prestigious scholarships: the NASA Astronaut Scholarship and the Goldwater Scholarship. Her research, in the lab of Bruce Downie (associate professor of horticulture at the UK College of Agriculture), focuses on light and temperature signals that govern the germination of seeds. Understanding these mechanisms will allow researchers to improve agriculture in light of rising global temperatures.

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications), additional footage from UK Athletics

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Gareth Voss (Part 2)

Gareth ("Gary") Voss came to the University of Kentucky to do research on the regenerative abilities of salamanders as a sophomore in high school. Now a freshman at UK, Gary has conducted research that resulted in two papers. "They're very good papers," says his UK mentor Dr. Randal Voss. "We're not just talking about a couple of throw-away papers to 'Ranger Rick' journal. We're sending these papers to the top journals in the United States.

"It really is a coup for UK when we can get our top local talent to stay in state. Gary's a National Merit Scholar, and he could have gone to any university he wanted to, but he chose to come to UK."

To learn more about Dr. Voss' lab, visit ambystoma.org/

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Gareth Voss (Part 1)

As a Paul Laurence Dunbar High School student, Gareth ("Gary") Voss came to the University of Kentucky to do research on the regenerative abilities of salamanders in Dr. Randal Voss's lab. Gary says, "At Dunbar in the Math-Science program, we have to join a faculty member at UK for a research project by the beginning of our junior year. And I heard about a professor at UK, who shared the same last name and the same first name, more or less, as my dad and his name is Randall Voss and he studies salamanders and regeneration.Things kind of clicked and I’ve been there ever since."

Gary's high-school project focused on tail regeneration. He notes, "I was not allowed to do any of the surgeries to remove the tails, but I was able to do the data analysis on the tails, and do a lot of interesting things in studying the regeneration of the salamanders."

Gary is now a freshman at UK majoring in biology and chemistry, and he says getting started early in research is really an advantage. "Getting started early gets you exposed to all the things you need to know. I was exposed to more things in genetics than most people my age would have been. Working in the lab not only puts you on the cutting edge of research and science, but it also lets you see all the things your classes are talking about in person, and to a greater extent."

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

For more information on Dr. Voss' lab, please visit ambystoma.org/

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

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