UK

Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame 2014

The College of Arts and Sciences inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame Oct. 10, 2014, with a ceremony at the Singletary Center for the Arts, bringing the current totals to 38 alumni and 13 emeritus faculty A&S Hall of Fame members.

2014 Alumni Inductees:

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

Robert Straus Lipman

Jill M. Rappis

George H. Scherr

2014 Emeriti Faculty Inductees:

George C. Herring

Keith B. MacAdam

View their Hall of Fame videos here: as.uky.edu/celebrates-new-hall-fame-members

Four UK Biologists Form Regeneration "Cluster"

How are some animals able to regrow body parts following injury? Why can't humans do the same thing? Four professors in the University of Kentucky in the Department of Biology—Ann Morris, Randal Voss, Jeramiah Smith, and Ashley Seifert—are undertaking the basic scientific research needed to begin to answer these questions. Each scientist approaches the problem from a different angle, focusing on different aspects of regeneration, and using different vertebrate models. Together, they make up the core of an unofficial regeneration "cluster" within the department.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Regeneration Bonus: Ann Morris

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Ann Morris and zebrafish.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-ann-morris

 

 

Naff Symposium 2014: Donald E. Ingber, "From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering"

 

 

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Donald E. Ingber Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Abstract: The newly emerging field of Biologically Inspired Engineering centers on understanding the fundamental principles that Nature uses to build and control living systems, and on applying this knowledge to engineer biologically inspired materials and devices for medicine, industry and the environment. A central challenge in this field is to understand of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade devices that exhibit or selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work that has begun to reveal these design principles that guide self-assembly of living 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. Key to this process is that the molecular frameworks of our cells, tissues and organs are stabilized using a tension-dependent architectural system, known as ‘tensegrity’, and these tensed molecular scaffolds combine mechanical load-bearing functions with solid-phase biochemical processing activities. I will describe how this structural perspective has led to new insights into the molecular basis of cellular mechanotransduction – the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry, gene expression and thereby influence cell fate decisions during tissue and organ development. In addition, I will present how these scientific advances have been facilitated by development of new micro- and nano-technologies, including engineering of novel human organ-on-a-chip microdevices that also have great potential value as replacements for animal testing in drug development and discovery research. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization, and how scientific discovery and technology development can be facilitated by equally melding fundamental science and applied engineering, are critical for anyone who wants to fully harness the power of biology.

 

 

Naff Symposium 2014: Hao Yan, "Designer Architectures for Programmable Self-Assembly"

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Hao Yan, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University

Abstract: The central task of nanotechnology is to control motions and organize matter with nanometer precision. To achieve this, scientists have investigated a large variety of materials including inorganic materials, organic molecules, and biological polymers as well as different methods that can be sorted into so-called “bottom-up” and “top-down” approaches. Among all of the remarkable achievements made, the success of DNA self-assembly in building programmable nanopatterns has attracted broad attention. In this talk I will present our efforts in using DNA as an information-coding polymer to program and construct DNA nano-architectures with complex geometrical features. Use of designer DNA architectures as molecular sensor, actuator and scaffolds will also be discussed.

Giving Back During UK Breaks: Who Does that?

 

 

Drew Ritzel is just one of hundreds of UK students who have participated in an Alternative Spring Break trip — either a weekend excursion or a weeklong adventure — to volunteer.

Ritzel, a junior biology major from Dayton, Ohio, went on his first ASB trip as a freshman and since that experience, he’s been hooked.

Special Thanks to Casey Smith of Wildcat Student TV for video from the trip to Nicaragua.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit uky.edu/UKNow. A direct link to this story is uknow.uky.edu/content/giving-back-during-uk-breaks-who-does

 

 

UK Undergraduates Discuss "Posters-at-the-Capitol"

 

 

Fifteen UK students will join hundreds of other undergraduates from around the state to present "Posters at the Capitol" in Frankfort on Feb. 21, 2013. Now in its 12th year, the event gives these students an opportunity to showcase their research projects to state legislators, emphasizing the importance of research in universities.

This video comes courtesy of UK Public Relations and Marketing

 

 

Kentucky NSF EPSCoR success stories: Schyler Nunziata

 

 

Schyler Nunziata is a first-year Ph.D. student in biology at the University of Kentucky, and she's just one of the young scientists that can testify to the impact of Kentucky's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as Kentucky EPSCoR. Nunziata, who works in David Weisrock's lab that combines genetics, genomics and evolutionary biology, received two grants from the National Science Foundation through EPSCoR. The first $5,000 grant, while she was a masters student at Eastern Kentucky University, funded her entire thesis project which involved collecting two lined salamanders, developing genetic markers, and genotyping the salamanders. The second grant, as a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky, allowed her to prepare a pilot study. Nunziata says, "EPSCoR helps get students into research, helps develop them as scientists. For me, it allowed me to delve deeper into a field that I was interested in and find out what research was like and what a career in research would entail. EPSCoR has had a huge impact on my career path."

Visit the Weisrock Lab website - sweb.uky.edu/~dweis2/The_Weisrock_Lab/Front_Page.html

Kentucky EPSCoR has been the channel for over $430 million in research funding to the Commonwealth's academic institutions. Over 80 percent of this funding has been competitively won from federal research programs. In addition to supporting 1,400 research jobs and providing research training for over 2,300 students, this funding has created 21 research centers and major research initiatives on Kentucky's campuses. For more, visit kyepscor.org and kynsfepscor.org.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit uky.edu/UKNow. A direct link to this story is uknow.uky.edu/content/kentucky-nsf-epscor-success-stories-featured-video-series .

The UK videos were produced by REVEAL (research.uky.edu/reveal), a site that offers multimedia with the stories behind the leading-edge research under way in colleges across the University of Kentucky campus.

 

 

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