regeneration

Four UK Biologists Form Regeneration "Cluster"

How are some animals able to regrow body parts following injury? Why can't humans do the same thing? Four professors in the University of Kentucky in the Department of Biology—Ann Morris, Randal Voss, Jeramiah Smith, and Ashley Seifert—are undertaking the basic scientific research needed to begin to answer these questions. Each scientist approaches the problem from a different angle, focusing on different aspects of regeneration, and using different vertebrate models. Together, they make up the core of an unofficial regeneration "cluster" within the department.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Regeneration Bonus: Randal Voss

 

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Randal Voss and axolotls.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-randal-voss

Regeneration Bonus: Jeramiah Smith

 

 

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Jeramiah Smith, salamanders and sea lampreys.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read the full story here: uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-jeramiah-smith

 

 

Regeneration Bonus: Jeramiah Smith

Biologist Jeramiah Smith studies salamanders and sea lamprey to find genetic clues to regeneration.

Regeneration Bonus: Ann Morris

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Ann Morris and zebrafish.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-ann-morris

 

 

Regeneration Bonus: Ashley Seifert

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Ashley Seifert, postdoc Tom Gawriluk, and African spiny mice.

This video appears courtesy of UK Research Media.

Story: uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-ashley-seifert-0

 

 

Regeneration Group: Ashley Seifert

Professor Ashley Seifert, whose research is focused on skin regeneration, is studying the African spiny mouse, a tiny mammal with some amazing regenerative abilities.

New Faculty 2013: Meet Ashley Seifert

The Department of Biology is excited to welcome Assistant Professor Ashley Seifert to its faculty!
 
Seifert's work at UK will revolve around exploring the ways in which different organisms can regenerate tissue. The aim being to eventually use that information in order to help people who are either sick or injured. For more information on Seifert's research projects, check out the podcast "Out On A Limb -- The Science of Regeneration." 
 
This podcast is part of a series highlighting the new faculty members who joined the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall 2013 semester.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Of Mice and Men...And Sleep - Bruce O’Hara and Colleagues Receive an NIH Grant

Professor Bruce O’Hara in the Department of Biology is interested in the overall quality of your sleep. In his research laboratory in the Thomas Hunt Morgan Building, O’Hara investigates sleep patterns and circadian rhythms within the brain.

Out On A Limb -- The Science of Regeneration: Ashley Seifert

Biology Professor Ashley Seifert describes his job as a scientist and educator at the University of Kentucky as one of the best gigs around. It’s hard to disagree. 
 
Seifert only recently joined UK but he is already making big plans for the research he hopes to conduct. His background is one of a developmental and regeneration biologist meaning he studies creatures—mainly vertebrates—who have the ability to regenerate parts of themselves. 
 
Through their study, Seifert hopes to not only shed light on how these animals do what they do but learn potential new ways to help people who may be either sick or injured.
 
In this podcast, Seifert discusses the research he’ll be conducting at UK, his goals, the different species of animals he’ll be working with, and how being a scientist is one of the best gigs around. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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